Monthly Archives: November 2014

All is. All is.

Sometimes, the sunset pulls me out of my idle moments and causes me to run. Run to a better place to have a view. Run before it’s gone. Run to feel the cold air on my cheeks.

It’s way too often I get paralyzed. I see the sunset, and I appreciate it for but a moment before turning back to my habitual anodynes. Today, I am grateful for the sunset and the sun rise. I am grateful for the great bowl of a valley that I live in that is bordered by jagged gateways ascending ever upwards towards the sky. I am grateful to the volcanoes and the cranes. The roses in full bloom beside the late autumn harvests. The rough boughs of the persimmon trees bountiful with great orange fruits. I can feel the cold promise of snow, in the air. I can see my breath floating upwards. And I want to say all is well.

All is well.

All is well.

IMG_1133[1]

All is…so intensely beautiful even amongst the flickering of other issues.

The hardest way (一番難しいやり方)

私はいつも物事を一番難しいやり方でやって見たいです。しかし、それはいたずらな趣味です。もし、一番難しいを方法のみで挑戦したら、すぐ疲れるでしょう。それで、一番効果的な練習方法ができないでしょう。

圧倒的な感じがあったら何も学べません。

早く上達したいなら、ゆっくりとしたほうがいいです。

いつ、激しいく練習したらいいですか。

基本的なことが気にならなくなったところで激しい練習をするといいです。

I always want to try the hardest way of doing things. However, that is a vain action. If you only try to challenge the most difficult way of doing things, you will quickly become tired. Then, you can’t do the most effective method. If you feel overwhelmed, you can’t learn anything. If you want to improve quickly, it’ good to go slowly.

When is it OK to practice harder? Once you do not mind the basics, you can practice harder.

A letter from the past

The other day, I received a letter written by the 16 year old me in the mail. (Thank’s high school English teacher! You are amazing!) If I had to write back to myself, I would write two words, “Write more.”

All that aside, the day that we wrote these letters, we were asked to list some goals for life.

Mine included:

1. A gold medal in the Olympics for archery.

Arch2

2. Open up “Kick-Ats Coffee” (Basically my dream coffee shop)

nyu 006

3. Complete school

4.Stay Healthy

5. Gain some proper companions.

6. Fluency in Japanese.

IMG_1319

Well, 16 year old me…We graduated from college, we seem to be pretty healthy, and we seem to have some nice real life friends, even if we do need to put a little more work in on our end with communicating with them! I’m living in Japan right now, and getting ready to test for JLPT N3, we are by absolutely no means fluent, but we’re on the path…You got to visit Japan right after graduating from High School, and were ridiculously obsessed with the idea of getting back there. Once you dropped out of college, you completely forgot that dream…you know, because you need a degree to get a visa to go to live and work in Japan. So, you remember that time you memorized about 500 Kanji? Well, we’re re-hashing all of those, but it’s “easier” this time. It’s funny how you forgot that dream, and the coincidence of returning to Japan was a consequence of that SCIENCE degree that you took on to make it easier to get a job out of college doing NOTHING for your employment search in the US which consequentially caused you to REMEMBER a forgotten dream of entering the English teaching workforce…(and realize some other plans to keep you in for the long run.)

In University, you were on the varsity archery team. You didn’t do all that great. It’s ok, I forgive you. However, now you can casually pull out a bow and get a damn good grouping of arrows, so if we want to try for that gold medal at some point, it could be possible with some elbow grease.

As for the coffee shop…that might happen and it might not…You worked at one of your FAVORITE coffee shops right after college, and got a good taste for the work that would go into running a place…

OK that’s all for now. Cheerio.